Care Concern Homecare

Posts Tagged "Best practice"

Inside the Industry: Social Inclusion

The final film in the Dignity in Care series focuses on Social Inclusion. Our clip beings at 5 minutes and 33 seconds. As we get older, we can be at risk of becoming isolated. This can be for a number …

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The final film in the Dignity in Care series focuses on Social Inclusion. Our clip beings at 5 minutes and 33 seconds.

As we get older, we can be at risk of becoming isolated. This can be for a number of reasons including mobility issues, health or circumstances. At Care Concern Homecare we recognise how important it is for our clients to continue their existing contact with the outside world and we do all we can to maintain and strengthen this.

As Catherine explains, “From the very first visit that we do, when we do the assessment, we try to find out if there is somewhere they go regularly. So we make sure then that the carers’ visits don’t clash with that. We realise how important it is for people to get out.”

Emma describes in the video how best to maintain and enhance social inclusion, “Get to know the person, get to know things they like, just have a little chat when you’re going down the road or to the post office. Just to see people, it’s nice. Thinking outside the box of what would include them, what they like, maybe activities, hobbies, just things to get them out the house. Even if it is just for half an hour or an hour.”

The impact of social inclusion on someone’s wellbeing should not be underestimated. We actively seek ways to support our clients in staying in touch with the outside world.

  Posted by Administrator on December 9, 2014  /  Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Finalist for ‘Best Employer’ Skills for Care Accolade

We are incredibly excited and very proud to have been short-listed as a finalist for the Skills for Care Accolades 2014/2015 in the ‘Best Employer of under 250 staff’ category! The Skills for Care Accolades recognise organisations and employers who …

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We are incredibly excited and very proud to have been short-listed as a finalist for the Skills for Care Accolades 2014/2015 in the ‘Best Employer of under 250 staff’ category!

The Skills for Care Accolades recognise organisations and employers who are committed to delivering high quality care and developing their workforce. We were informed in October that a Skills for Care Area Officer would be visiting us in November to verify that the content of our application form was true and correct. Following this visit, it was confirmed that we have been shortlisted with two other entries. The final judging panels will be sitting in February and the winner will be announced on the 12th of March.

To be short-listed is a wonderful  achievement that we feel recognises our endeavours. We work incredibly hard to have a well-trained and highly skilled workforce that are capable, competent and confident in their roles. Over 81% of our workforce have a QCF diploma and we are continuously sourcing additional training courses to further enhance the knowledge of our staff.

Registered Manager, Catherine Gunnewicht said, “To be short-listed as a finalist is very exciting. I’m very proud of our standards and the commitment our carers have to their work and their continued professional development.”

Most recently, 23 of our staff attended a Parkinson’s workshop led by someone living with Parkinson’s. It was a most insightful session and those who attended found it fascinating. This is just one example of how we prioritise the development of our staff in an incredibly challenging and ever-changing industry.

We will be sure to share the results when they are announced in March!

 

 

 

  Posted by Administrator on November 24, 2014  /  Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Inside the Industry: Privacy

Here is the second film in the Dignity in Care series focusing on privacy. Our clip starts at … This film discusses what should be private: our personal information, our rooms, using the bathroom, our post, our phone calls, our …

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Here is the second film in the Dignity in Care series focusing on privacy. Our clip starts at …

This film discusses what should be private: our personal information, our rooms, using the bathroom, our post, our phone calls, our relationships. The film describes how privacy is a fundamental aspect of maintaining dignity.

It is the small things that contribute greatly to someone maintaining their dignity whilst receiving care. Catherine explains how “if it’s safe to do so, I always think it’s nice to let people be in the bathroom for a little while on their own. If you’re a little bit worried you could maybe stand on the other side of the door but I think letting people be alone in the bathroom for a little while is nice.”

Our desire for privacy in our lives doesn’t diminish as we get older and it is the actions shown in this film that allow our clients to maintain dignity and have independence within the constraints of the care that they require.

  Posted by Administrator on November 24, 2014  /  Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Inside the Industry: Communication

Here is the second film in the Dignity in Care series focusing on communication. Our clip starts at 4 minutes and 7 seconds. This film looks at the importance of communication through a variety of methods with clients, care workers …

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Here is the second film in the Dignity in Care series focusing on communication. Our clip starts at 4 minutes and 7 seconds.

This film looks at the importance of communication through a variety of methods with clients, care workers and families. Good communication ensures our clients get to make choices about how they live, even if it is as simple as the jumper they prefer to wear on a particular day.

Catherine describes how to avoid overwhelming people,  “A lot of our people have got dementia…. so sometimes what’s quite nice is to bring two or three things out and show it… and they will be able to point to what they like.”

People respond in different ways. As our care workers get to know their clients, they discover the best ways to communicate.

When someone is not cooperating, Catherine explains how “they sometimes respond to mirroring… you could actually start doing the movement [brushing their teeth] and they could pick up on that movement and start doing that themselves. There is no right or wrong way. It is about getting to know that person and what they respond to.”

 We work closely with our care workers and keep in regular contact with the families of our service users. John explains, “From time to time you get new situations and you have really quite important judgement calls. Particularly when to call in other people’s help. But there is a lot of support and… if in doubt, pass the decision up [to care managers].”

Jean mentions visit record sheets in the film which our care workers use to write notes in about their visits. This allows us to keep track of the well-being of our clients and allows their families to stay up to date.

Good communication is key to providing the best care possible to our clients.

 

 

  Posted by Administrator on November 24, 2014  /  Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Inside the Industry: Choice and Control

In February of this year, we were approached by Media 19 working on behalf of the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) to feature in four films about Dignity in Care. After months of keeping it a secret, the films …

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In February of this year, we were approached by Media 19 working on behalf of the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) to feature in four films about Dignity in Care. After months of keeping it a secret, the films have finally been made public this week on SCIE’s website and we are very excited to share them!

Catherine worked very hard to coordinate our care workers and service users to feature in the films. It was no mean feat!

We’re going to do a blog series over the next four weeks focusing on each of the films individually. The first one is about Choice and Control:

When someone is receiving care, it is important to understand their capabilities and limitations. What are they able to do on their own? What do they need support with? Finding this balance allows the service user to make independent choices and feel in control of their lives.

As Emma says in the video, “You need to get to know the person quite well to understand their needs. Listen to what they want and their needs. Follow their lead.”

Gaenor describes how she retains choice and control, “One can still decide what you want to do such as when you want new clothes or new shoes. It just ensures that you don’t lose all control of your life.”

Catherine explains how we “enable them [our service users] to do things for themselves.”

What do Choice and Control mean to you? How do you ensure that people you care for have choice and control in their lives?

  Posted by Administrator on November 18, 2014  /  Tags: , , , , , , ,